November 10 2017

Lest We Forget

A minute to reflect

This weekend we will pause to reflect on those who paid the ultimate sacrifice in defence of our great nation. The image often conjured to help us focus our minds is of a lone tommy, head bowed as he leans heavily on his Lee Enfield rifle. We consider the men–and women who made those sacrifices, losing life or limb so we may live our lives in peace. But as we pause, silent for the obligatory minute, let us consider these two questions:

Is our ‘great’ nation truly one to be proud of? And do we really live in peace?

 

A word of warning: you may prefer to use today to simply salute the many lone tommies and reflect on their dedication. If this is so, and if you’d rather not cloud the picture with thoughts of why we as a nation continue to expect them to pay the high price to support our government’s military agendas, quit now. You may not like what follows.

Contradictions abound

Clues to the two questions posed above, the answers to which become ever urgent with each passing day, may be obtained if we use the minute’s silence to examine our nation’s wars in a twenty-first century context. For example, when was the last time our troops lost their lives in defence of Britain and its values? Much is made of our defence budget, and its importance in protecting our shores, but the term is a misnomer–a fallacy.

Since 2001 our forces have been used in a series of illegal, offensive wars of conquest and regime change with the sole aim of furthering Anglo-American geo-political ambitions across the Middle East. These aims were amply demonstrated in the American neo-conservative document–Project for the New American Century–produced in 2000. The group’s overarching aim was to:

‘… shape a new century favourable to American principles and interests.’ [Together with challenging] ‘… regimes hostile to U.S. interest and values.’

These ‘hostile regimes’ were clearly reflected in a 2007 statement made by US General Wesley Clark:

 

Among the PNAC document’s unambiguous declarations were:

To preserve [global Pax Americana] — ‘American peace’ through the 21st century, the PNAC report concludes that the global order ‘must have a secure foundation on unquestioned U.S. military preeminence.’

It also stated:

The process of transformation is likely to be a long one, absent some catastrophic and catalyzing event — like a new Pearl Harbor.

This ‘catastrophic and catalyzing’ event occurred only a year after the document’s publication — on September 11th, 2001. This was the green light America and her allies needed to enact their pre-emptive wars on nations that posed no threat to the West–wars that were therefore illegal.

It may interest you to know that one of the key authors of this document–Philip Zelikow–is also the man who gave us the official account of 9/11, the ultimate in bizarre conspiracy theories that is an affront to every human being with a modicum of intelligence.

But what of the consequences of the ensuing pre-emptive actions, and where do they fit in the context of our own Remembrance Sunday?

Pawns lost to the game

Between 2001 and 2015, 456 British military personnel lost their lives in Afghanistan. A further 179 died between 2003 and 2009 in Iraq.

This is a tragedy outweighed many times over by the 200,000+ innocent civilians who were victims of our nations’ actions. Innocent civilians who died in your name; my name. Civilians whose only crime was to live in an area of strategic importance to the West and its energy needs.

What of the tens of thousands of men, women and children who continue to suffer from our military’s illegal use of depleted uranium warheads? The many babies who continue to be born with horrific, painful deformities. And what of the crippling distress that has resulted from the West’s inhumane sanctions and the consequential devastating regional instability? If you have compassion you’ll spare a thought for these people, too.

Ultimate sacrifice

So, on November 11 we consider the sacrifices made by our military personnel. But sacrifices are not restricted to life, limb and time lost with loved ones. Peace of mind is forfeit, too.

Why, since 2001, have more servicemen died as a result of suicide than the number lost in battle? Whilst many will no doubt have been traumatised by the loss of comrades on the front lines, how many have been sickened by the nature of their undertaking–to fight an illegal war against innocents in order to satisfy the greed of multi-billion dollar corporations? Corporations who’re the real drivers behind our so-called democracies and who prowl the battlefield’s edges, waiting to capitalise on the resulting destruction.

In sending our forces onto the field under such circumstances, we not only demand their loyalty and discipline, we ask them to put aside their compassion–their moral compass; to ignore the insistent voice of conscience in support of their corrupt, duplicitous governments.

Consenting lambs

Consider this: neither the US nor the UK imposes conscription to fill the ranks of their military. All combatants are willing volunteers.

With that thought in mind, allow me to close with lines from ‘Universal Soldier‘ by Buffy Sainte-Marie, a Canadian singer/songwriter of Native-American parentage.

No doubt her heritage gave her a unique perspective to write so eloquently of the futility of war and the suffering caused by military action.

He’s five feet two and he’s six feet four
He fights with missiles and with spears
He’s all of 31 and he’s only 17
He’s been a soldier for a thousand years

He’s a Catholic, a Hindu, an athiest, a Jain,
a Buddhist and a Baptist and a Jew
and he knows he shouldn’t kill
and he knows he always will
kill you for me my friend and me for you

And he’s fighting for Canada,
he’s fighting for France,
he’s fighting for the USA,
and he’s fighting for the Russians
and he’s fighting for Japan,
and he thinks we’ll put an end to war this way

And he’s fighting for Democracy
and fighting for the Reds
He says it’s for the peace of all
He’s the one who must decide
who’s to live and who’s to die
and he never sees the writing on the walls

But without him how would Hitler have
condemned him at Dachau
Without him Caesar would have stood alone
He’s the one who gives his body
as a weapon to a war
and without him all this killing can’t go on

He’s the universal soldier and he
really is to blame
His orders come from far away no more
They come from him, and you, and me
and brothers can’t you see
this is not the way we put an end to war

 

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September 12 2017

9-11: FROM SUPER-POWER to SUPER-PARIAH

 

Mass Murder & the American Dream

It would never come into their heads to fabricate colossal untruths, and they would not believe that others could have the impudence to distort the truth so infamously.

Even though the facts which prove this to be so may be brought clearly to their minds, they will still doubt and waver and will continue to think that there may be some other explanation.

For the grossly impudent lie always leaves traces behind it, even after it has been nailed down, a fact which is known to all expert liars in this world and to all who conspire together in the art of lying.

These people know only too well how to use falsehood for the basest purposes.

Adolf Hitler – Mein Kampf

An End to Complacency

Last week I risked disdain by adding a post here entitled Nine-Eleven: More Monstrous than Cthulhu

The post was quite timely given that this month sees the sixteenth anniversary of that dreadful Tuesday when three towers of the World Trade Centre collapsed and the world changed forever.

Did I say timely? Perhaps not. Like many people, including the current US president, I suspected that something was seriously amiss that day, yet I’ve allowed sixteen years of complacency to lapse before speaking out.

Enough of that—now is the time to add my voice to the increasing millions demanding an investigation into the events surrounding 9-11 and for the real perpetrators to be held accountable.

Make no mistake, those demanding justice are not confined to spotty, bearded conspiracy theorists weaned on endless reruns of The X Files. Instead, they include intelligent professionals who have a personal stake in the findings of an accurate and impartial investigation.

They include:

Architects and Engineers, men and women responsible for the design and construction of high rise buildings and who need to know why tower blocks failed to survive those incidents they’d been designed to endure.

Firefighters whose procedure for fighting fires in high rise buildings—that of forming a position on the floor beneath the fire from which to attack the flames—is rendered unsuitable, based on the towers’ collapse.

Airline pilots who’re aware it would have been impossible for inexperienced hijackers to have flown the Boeing 767s into the towers due to the immense stresses placed on civil aircraft flying fast at low altitudes, and the handling difficulties this would have caused. Using flight simulators, qualified pilots with thousands of hours flying time have been unable to replicate such manoeuvres with the same degree of accuracy.

The list goes on and includes the likes of lawyers, scholars and other professional bodies, not just in America but worldwide.

Come on, guys, who’re you kidding?
Master of ‘false flag’ covert operations

Join the Dots

Once you seek the truth you become presented with an array of undeniable facts. Each fact is a dot in a confused image.

The true culprits don’t fear this information being available to you. Instead, they’re only too aware that the mass of data can be smoke and mirrors hiding the realities of 9-11.

What they don’t want, however—and what they fear most of all—is for you to join those dots. For only then will you be presented with a picture so immoral and horrific it will take your breath away.

 

Blinded by Decency

In view of the overwhelming and irrefutable information that supports allegations of an ‘inside job’ and government conspiracy, why would one such as I suffer disdain by speaking out?

One reason is that the implications of such accusations are too monstrous for decent, law-abiding citizens to consider. So outrageous in fact that many prefer not to seek out the evidence that sits in plain sight for those willing to look.

Another cause is utter helplessness: ‘So what if it’s true? What can we do?’

The answer to that one is ‘nothing’—alone. But the adage ‘strength in unity’ holds fast here, too. And consider this: of the immense wealth at the perpetrators’ disposal, and the resources and apparatus that wealth affords them, their main weapons cost them nothing—for those weapons are your common decency and your sense of helplessness.

Is it so difficult to imagine state-sponsored mass murder? We only need to look to Nazi Germany of 1939 to 1945 to discover one example. Whilst I make no comparisons, here we have another instance of state-engineered murder conducted to achieve political ambitions.

And here’s the irony: Evidence of the Nazi atrocities is incontestable and any who refuse to accept the facts are branded ‘holocaust deniers’ and quite rightly ostracised. On the other hand, those who view 9-11’s equally damning evidence as confirmation of a government plot are considered ‘conspiracy theorists’. Such is the power of a state-controlled media.

Did I say state controlled? What other explanation accounts for the fact that the UK’s flagship ‘impartial’ media organisation, the BBC, announced the collapse of WTC-7 twenty-three minutes before the event?

If we are to finally bring those guilty of the 9-11 murders to account, it’s time to add the weight of our combined voices to those of the professionals listed above, not just in the USA or Britain, but worldwide. In view of the hideous chain of events that have occurred since September 2001, the consequences of inaction now would be dire.

CSI Ground Zero

Leaving the why and the how aside for the moment, if you still have doubts that the US government was responsible for the events of that tragic Tuesday, let us agree on this: whether it was the result of terrorist action or government conspiracy, Ground Zero represented a massive crime scene.

Ground Zero Crime Scene

As we know, when a crime has been committed, all efforts are made to preserve the integrity of the scene to ensure accurate and untainted forensic evidence is compiled allowing for a full investigation to occur.

Yet in the immediate aftermath of 9-11, and while George W Bush was delaying the implementation of an enquiry, fleets of trucks—up to four hundred per day—were used to systematically remove this evidence. Rather than cart it to a safe location for further analysis, however, it was shipped to China for ‘recycling’.

So, whether you consider 9-11 to be the result of terrorism or government conspiracy, this destruction of vital crime scene evidence following the murder of almost three thousand innocent civilians itself constituted a crime of staggering proportions—a crime for which the ‘hijackers’ could not have been held responsible, despite the other miracles that we’re given to believe occurred that day.

A Recycled Idea

Operation Northwoods US military strategy, 1962 style

While you still struggle with the possibility that 9-11 may have been engineered to cause fear among the American people, curb their civil rights and achieve predetermined military and political objectives, consider Operation Northwoods, a plan drawn up in 1962 and signed by Chief of Staff, Lyman Lemnitzer.

Proposed treason, 1962 Given a hero’s burial, 1988

The treasonous proposal to hijack airplanes and conduct acts of terrorism against US civilians and military targets to justify a war against Cuba was vehemently rejected by John F Kennedy.

Of those two named individuals, one was later assassinated in Dallas in 1963, and the other promoted to become NATO’s Supreme Allied Commander and, after his death in 1988, afforded a heroes’ burial in Washington’s Arlington Cemetery.

I leave you to draw your own conclusions.

John F Kennedy
Opposed Northwoods, 1962
Murdered, 1963

A Marriage made in Hell

I’m British. Several weeks ago, I would have declared ‘I’m British and intensely proud of that fact,’ but no more.

Whilst it would be easy for me to sit here atop a perceived moral high ground and glare scornfully across the Atlantic to our cousins seduced by the purity of their flag, recent events have shattered my illusions and left me wondering about our own government’s culpability in American ambitions for ‘A New World Order’.

It is common knowledge that Saudi Arabia has long been the wellspring for such as ISIS and the radicalisation of UK Muslims. In fact, despite previously negotiating arms deals worth billions with the Saudis, our own government commissioned a report into their terrorist activities. A report that, despite recent pleas made by 9-11 survivors, requesting Theresa May to reveal the contents and so shed light on the truth of 9-11, remains top-secret under the age-old pretext of ‘national security’.

Does this make you feel secure? Who are the government really protecting? Equally importantly, why?

While we continue to support our US allies, ponder this:

At the end of the second world war, when Europe lay in ruins, America was forced to look elsewhere if it was to pursue its aims of perpetual war.  Its eyes turned on Asia resulting in its wars in Korea and Vietnam. More recently, the Middle East has entered American cross-hairs.

Who will be their next target as they continue to strive for world domination, dragging their compliant allies behind them?

Blatant Hypocrisy at the Cenotaph

On November 11 we will once again remember our fallen heroes. We’ll watch as our politicians line up at the cenotaph—politicians who continue to send our servicemen and women in support of the US’s self-engineered ‘war on terror’. There, wearing their dark suits and pious solemnity, they’ll lay their wreaths.

But what of those whose names adorn the memorial; those who paid the ultimate price to defend Britain? What value do you think they would place on their sacrifice if they could see what this nation had become in their absence?

What luck for rulers that men do not think.

Adolf Hitler – Mein Kampf

 

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June 5 2017

A pause to reflect

First …

… a disclaimer. This is my personal blog, so what follows are my own views, expressed in my own way. I don’t expect my readers to agree with me and I respect your own opinions as I would hope you respect mine.

A sad day

Yesterday, like millions of my countrymen, I was deeply saddened by Saturday night’s events in London. Deeply saddened. Even those words don’t come close to summarising my feelings. Events such as this one and Manchester before it render words impotent; rendering me unable to adequately express my emotions, exacerbating my frustration.

On hearing of the frenzied knife attack I was close to tears — a feeling that would repeat itself several times through Sunday. Once again, hate-filled parasitic psychopaths were on the streets of this country slaughtering and maiming our people with apparent impunity. Yes, it cost them their lives, but the deed was done, their perverse mission accomplished.

Again, I was imagining the hospital beds with victims who’s lives had been ruined, their bodies maimed, their peace of mind torn asunder. Those grieving for loved ones who had been taken from them by crazed, hate-filled maniacs who loathe to see others enjoying life to the full.

My frustration was borne out of not only my inability to do anything in response, but my intense pride at being a Briton. Despite the seditious efforts of our nay-saying, finger-pointing, fear-mongering media, I’m proud of this nation, its heritage, accomplishments and values.

Britain is a fine country. The finest in my view. From this tiny island we have influenced world events like no other. Yes, our empire is long gone but its strength lives on in our very DNA. We are a strong nation, punching way above our weight when the need arises as it often has in the past. Our forces are the finest in the world, both military and civil. And our citizens are being murdered before our eyes. Often by people who we have given homes to, educated and supported through our welfare system.

Frustration was clearly evident yesterday, and little wonder. I even gave vent to my own anger with a couple of rants on social media. This doesn’t make me racist, it makes me human.

Yesterday I felt not only frustration but hatred, too. But where to direct that hatred?

The common denominator in the significant atrocities committed against this nation since nine-eleven has been that the perpetrators have been Muslim. I think I may be excused, therefore, for directing my own hatred toward Muslims in general.

Need for perspective

But I don’t like to hate. It saddens me and weakens my spirit. If I was to overcome this negative approach it was vital that I quickly view things in a different light.

It may be a simplistic and naive approach, but I often look to history to provide me with a sense of perspective on issues occurring today. If used wisely, history can be a great teacher. Allow me then to go back to 1972.

In the early to mid 70s I was a student at senior school here in north Lincolnshire. Unlike many areas of the country, we had a very small Muslim community. In fact, pre-1972 I don’t recall any being in my home town, though there may have been some. But you get my point.

That changed to some degree in 1972 when my home town received several families expelled from Uganda by tyrannical dictator, Idi Amin. Like another, more well known dictator before him, he perversely viewed the enterprising successes of one race — in this case the Ugandan Asians — as the reason for others’ failure. Following a period of victimisation and abuse he expelled them. Some of these were UK citizens and therefore came to Britain.

A warm welcome

The families that arrived in my home town quickly integrated into the community and I was soon able to call them ‘friends’ as they merged seamlessly into our school. One young lad excelled at sports yet retained a modesty and honesty that did him credit. He always greeted people with a smile and possessed a sunny disposition. This is despite his experiences while living in Kampala.

At a time when my own limited experience of horror was the weekly black and white ‘B’-movies aired on a Friday night, this plucky youth recounted one of his experiences to fellow students by reading an extract from his history essay to the whole class.

In it he described the brutality of Idi Amin’s thugs on the streets of Kampala, an event during which he saw one man have his penis severed and thrust into his mouth. We were stunned. That this unassuming youth had borne witness to such atrocity was beyond our imagining.

In the land of his birth, he and his people were being terrorised by others who viewed them as an alien, abhorrent race.

A couple of years later, the boy’s sister joined me at the company where I then worked. Like him, she had a lovely nature and brought joy to the office. She possessed such grace and poise that was so clearly evident it generated complimentary comment from many who saw her.

Ugandan Asians arrive in Britain – victims of terrorism

Maligned memories, and a ray of hope

These, too, were Muslims who yesterday I found myself regarding generally in an un-Christian manner. This tarnishing of their memory by today’s terrorists angered me even more. So much so that, having viewed the mass of negativity on social media, I felt moved to comment in response to the following post:

In my reply, I stated:

The Muslims I have known have been genuine, kind and loving people. Sadly, I now find I view all with suspicion. A tragedy in itself.

What followed were many responses from Muslims who, at the close of a very dark day, gave me a glimmer of hope for the future. In particular, I’d like to thank Aleesha who said:

… and when reminded that the terrorists shouted ‘this is for Allah’ replied:

No more representative than the man who shouted “Britain first!” as he viciously stabbed and shot Jo Cox.

Close the divide

Yes, I agree that steps must be taken to bring about an end to these wanton acts of medieval savagery on our streets. In doing so, I hope that the nation’s many Muslims who share our outrage and our fears come together in vigorous support of our government, whoever that may be. Only this way will the widening gulf between neighbouring people be bridged and finally drawn together.

Footnote

I realise my small home town was only a miniature representation of Muslims and non-Muslims sharing the same community — but there were no enclaves, no isolated neighbourhoods separated by racial differences. We shared the same streets, school, interests and joys. Were were one community. It would be encouraging to think that, at some point in the future, this tiny model could be replicated throughout the country.

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